You Can Write it: All things are Possible

My hubby got me a bike for my birthday. I was thrilled because now I could actually make exercising fun. Also, he’d recently gotten one and now we could ride together.  The thing is Tennessee is hilly (now I know where they get the term hillbilly). You don’t think about it so much until you are walking it—or riding it. There are so many inclines in our subdivision trying to divert them is like trying to ride between rain drops.

Untold Story_Maya Angelo

When he and I started out on our first ride I was a little apprehensive and purposely avoided some streets because the inclines were much too steep. But after riding a while they all became steep and finally I came to the foot of a hill I knew would bring my ultimate demise.

I am not a chicken or faint at heart by any means but I looked at that hill and turned back to hubby and announced, “I can’t do it. I’m pushing the bike up the hill. I’ll meet you at the top.”

He smiled and calmly said, “You can do it.”

“No. I can’t. And I’m not going to try.”

Was he kidding?

“Nope. There’s no way.”

“You can do it.” He said.  “Take your time. Just take your time.”

Take my time? That’s not the way I’d done it in the past. I’d always gunned it. Maybe that’s why my legs felt like Jello when I got to the top. But aren’t you supposed to feel that way after a great feat? Completely spent?

I’ve always been an all or nothing kind of girl. Sometimes that has worked for me and sometimes not. Creating unrealistic expectations will leave you frazzled and beyond exhaustion and dreading what should be a somewhat pleasant experience. Obstacles in any situation where there is great accomplishment is assured; but should satisfaction only come at the end? No. The experience itself adds to the satisfaction of the end result. As we are tackling that novel or short story or biography we can make the journey pleasant but we can only do so when we take our time to embrace the worth of it. Go at a pace which will allow you to observe and learn and grow and stretch. This is the worth. Too many valuable life lessons get lost on the journey.

When hubby said, take your time it triggered something in me. I suddenly had faith in his method. He’d taken this ride before. He knew the way. So I looked at the hill and slowly ascended. I could feel the pull and stretching of my legs. I steadied my breathing. Several times I looked up at the hill and decided he was wrong; I was not going to make it.

And then another revelation came to me—don’t look at the top, you are focused on how far you have to go. So I concentrated my efforts on the road in front of me and suddenly the obstacle, the impossibility was only in my mind. But the more I focused on the immediacy of the road directly in front of me (and I could not deny that I was moving forward)  that impossibility left too. Why? Because I was doing it and my mind couldn’t argue with that fact that I was actually moving forward.

When I finally looked up again I was halfway up the steep and now it was just a matter of seeing it through. My results had silenced the voices.

As you move through your story, the voices of inadequacy, failure and confusion will be silenced. They cannot argue with the words you have written. You are doing it.

And then new voices will emerge telling you that what you have written is crap. They will mock that you are not a writer! But you will silence them too reminding them of what you have already accomplished. What you have done will be a testament to what you can do. And you will do it and no one will be able to argue the results.

 

Live on Purpose

Today determine to live on purpose live_I

How do you hit your target audience?

How do you hit your target audience?

 

hitting target

Several years ago my brother started a travel agent business and asked me to create a marketing blurb for his website. My first question to him was, “What is your target audience?” To which he replied, “Everyone. This business is for everyone.” It took us several days to come to the  agreement that marketing strategies by their very nature are targeted towards a specific group. It is not to say that your product won’t have crossover appeal but there is a core group to whom you will aim to please. The same is true with writing—whether it is fiction or non-fiction.

Focusing specifically on fiction there is a die-hard group that will devour every piece of historical fiction they can get their hands on. Some love thrillers and this is the first section they seek at the bookstore. Your book, your story will be written with an audience in mind. You will know them because either you are a part of that group or you have done your research.

Aim to get published

When you first begin to write your novel you will write from the heart. You have a story to tell and whether it is about flesh-eating zombies or nuns forsaking all for love it will come from your soul from which all questions stir. You chose this story because your imagination would not let you deny it. At the root of every story is the connection you have to it; every story you write will be a part of you in some way; it is life experiences mingled with knowledge and creative thoughts. But as you begin to go back edit and rewrite you will become more focused on your target audience. Those that say they don’t think about this because they are simply writing what they want are either not looking to get published or content with having their group of family and friends as their audience. This is not totally unheard of; William P. Young said that he only had his family and a few close friends in mind when he wrote The Shack. But they begin to share it with the world. Well, this doesn’t happen often and so our focus must be on our core group of readers. Is it the young mom who busies herself with the kids all day and then falls head over for that beautiful romance novel in the evening?  Maybe it is the ex-military officer that delves into historical fiction every chance he gets. Editors want to know who it is that you aim to please, therefore you will want to know too.

Make the book hard to put down

We write to our target audience and still make it our own—our own voice, theme, in other words our way of viewing the world. We learn the genre if it isn’t one with which we are completely familiar. We read books by authors who are doing it and doing it well. I say, don’t try to reinvent the wheel. Follow the tracks of the wheels already invented and later down the road veer on your own path. Have others who love the genre read your work. They know the flow of a sci-fi novel. They can decipher if certain technicalities are off. If you are a lover of the genre, write the kind of fiction you want to read—not the forgettable kind that you read on vacation and forget the storyline altogether by the time you’ve arrived home and unpacked. Write the mind gripping, gut-wrenching stuff that has you commenting to your FB friends on how great it was. You don’t know how to write such a story you say? Read the last book that did this for you. Now read it again and this time, not for pure pleasure. Pull on the techniques—why was it so compelling? What was it about the characters that made you care about them so much? Why did you cry at the end? And why are you still thinking about it even now?

Keep the target audience before you as you rewrite. Imagine them skimming the pages of your novel. See them laughing at certain points, glued to the pages while they are preparing dinner or listening via audio on their commute to work because they simply could not wait until the weekend. See them and write for them.

Man in the Arena

Man in the Arena

Just a little inspiration for a Tuesday….

 

roosevelt_quote

 

 

Don’t worry about the ones who question your reason for doing what you do. Go at it with all you’ve got.

1muhammad ali

Painting of Muhammad Ali by JaBrion Graham

The world needs to hear what you have to say.

 

SPEAK

 

The Relevancy of your Faith

japanesewomangivingthankstothecreatI’ve watched one or two of those reality shows that gather some of the brightest and gifted minds in the entertainment industry for a game of show; those who have fallen by fame’s wayside for one reason or another and are now attempting to make their second or third resurgence via reality TV. (The genre is a forgiving haven for those cast from the spotlight.) We are always asking, whatever happened to…

After a few painful episodes of this show and that one, I came to this realization: mere talent is not the main variable to success. Being the smartest or most gifted person in the room is become less and less a deciding indication of your escalation to fame. Do such things give you an advantage? Yes, sometimes. But often they are the greatest hindrance.

Those people that believe they are particularly bright, gifted or beautiful or have some kind of peculiar and intriguing talent usually rest in that very talent. They rely on it like an eagle does its wings. And when it fails, the fear settles in as they flutter around seeking Plan B. And no I’m not seething with jealousy or any kind of envy. I am just an observer.

Most of us have to confess our fears and insecurities upfront before we experience any kind of success. Our fears are daunting and undeniable and have to be dealt with head on. For that group of exceptional they can hide it for years behind the glossy beauty of talent and gifts. This is not to say that the rest of do not possess some kind of gift. I believe we all do. But for the majority no one hears us flawlessly playing Beethoven’s Fifth at six years of age, most of us aren’t 6’2 at 12, dunking shots off of grown men. No, for most of us we have to seek and find that place where we fit.  We have to work hard and face so much failure we threaten to quit every day.

It is here that our faith becomes the most relevant factor. It becomes the single most undeniable force; this is the fulcrum for our success. It is the Plan B for the most talented but necessary for us all.

Consider this: more than 300,000 books are published in the U.S. each year; and that is not including e-books. To sit for days, weeks, months and sometimes years at a keyboard with the sincere hope and belief that within that haystack someone besides our parents, siblings and spouse will find us takes some kind of faith. There will be many times where this feeling of ridiculousness will overwhelm you and you will question the validity of your project. And you will press through. Writer’s block will leave you stumped and confused. And you will not give up. Sometimes, you will count time vested as time wasted. You will blow this off.

And when the work is done, they will tell you that the real work hasn’t even begun. You’ve got to market that baby, they will say. You will sigh and roll your eyes and huff. Then you will get to work. You will read; how to publish a book in 30 days; 21 ways to double your Twitter followers in a week; Five thousand Fabulous Facebook Followers. A tiny voice will whisper that it is all gibberish and worthless. And you will initially be convinced to believe it (some of it will be), but quickly realize that doing nothing will result in eminent death of your project. And then your faith will push you, prod and demand from you.

And finally when you have done all that you can do your faith will compel you to release the reins. It is then you will see it clearer. Your marketing will make sense. Those who are needful to you will become more apparent. And most importantly, your faith has moved the hand of God. And He my friend is the most relevant factor of all.