The Power of Silence

The Power of Silence

A friend said to me one day that she couldn’t image her commute to work without music, that talk radio show she loves so much or something to fill the quiet. She went on to say that she knew someone who actually rode with nothing on. Can you imagine that? !

Yes, actually I can. I find it interesting that we are a culture that attempts to fill every white space, almost every moment of every day. The Daily News reports that  more than 80% of the world confesses that they can’t do without their mobile devices.

This leaves us with little to no precious time to clear our heads, our thoughts, evaluate what we’ve learned without forces sucking    us in to respond to some type of stimuli– begging us, beseeching us to buy or sell or react emotionally to some news, gossip or current event. Overloaded with information, we are often no better for it. We subconsciously take in stuff which produces no benefit in exchange for something, anything to fill our heads. It’s kind of like eating when you are clearly not hungry.

We seldom give ourselves time to evaluate, ponder or consider whether information is useful before we are back at it taking in more—stuff. And even when we are conversing with others in real time, we often do more talking than listening always ready to pour out from our head what we know. It just seems the natural thing to do considering we know so much. Sigh.

A few weeks ago I had the pleasure of sitting with a curmudgeon old lady who rarely smiles and is never up for small talk. She is not the one to chat about the weather –mentioning how unseasonably warm it is for the month of May. Her talk is purposeful and to the point. When she is done, she stops talking.

There was an incident which occurred with my son and her niece and she came to talk to me about it out of concern for her niece. My first reaction was one of defense. I wanted immediately to remind her that I have successfully raised three children and I’ve got this thank you. I wanted to tell her all I knew on child rearing. Did I mention I have three children? But something inside willed me to hush. Be silent. Listen. And so I did. I took in everything, immediately mentally applying it where it was necessary. No I didn’t listen as we often do; we barely hear what the person is saying because we are awaiting our turn to share, to tell what we know, add meaning and depth when often none is needed. No, I emptied myself of preconceived opinions and drank in her words.

 

silence

What I noticed is that truly listening is well…humbling. It is like sitting at the feet of a sage for the beauty of their knowledge. Assured that they have a perspective, you haven’t considered or experience in an area where you lack.

I saw that day behind that droopy, leathery face and glassy eyes a women who’d truly lived. Her life hadn’t been particularly exciting but she’d lived. It was the same kind of living I was doing. But the difference was she’d already been there. She wasn’t condescending or mean. She was calm, with a slow, measured rhythm to her words. She wouldn’t allow me to rush her But took her time to ensure I didn’t miss anything.

As writers silence is powerful because it allows us to process knowledge in a way that makes it useful, instead of busy chatter clogging our minds. We began to know how an experience feels, what it tastes like, what it smells like and the way it leaves you in the aftermath. It allows us to compartmentalize what we know and apply it when and where it’s needed and discard what is not needed or at least place it aside until the next time.

Silence is powerful because it shows control and discipline on our part. It forces us to think about what we are thinking about. It helps us to hear our inner voice. It is that voice—the spirit of a man, which guides us into truth, helps us to make sound decisions, not just based on how we feel, but what our spirit is revealing to us. It is the God part of us, because it is he who is feeding our spirit-man; yes. It is spirit to spirit.

The next time your emotions are screaming, or you are tempted to make a decision bred from some emotional high or low or you’re incited to write some crazy, impulsive comment on Twitter or another form of social media, based on what some political blowhard has feed you, I ask you to be still. Be silent. Consider. Think about it. Listen. Simply listen.

Stay Creative!

Stay Creative!

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The painful art of fiction writing

The painful art of fiction writing

Somehow, many have the notion that published authors have the answers–matters not the question.  If we put pen to paper then certainly we have this wealth of knowledge swelling up inside and if we don’t get it out quickly certainly we will implode and the world will be left wanting.

 

Ernest Hemingway_sitandbleed

This is not any truer than the statement that people pursue medicine because they possess the cure to the diseases of the world. Doctors pursue medical knowledge to find cures. We write because we need answers. Writing allows us to dissect our fears and face them with focus. It is with words that we can ask the questions through our characters actions and dialogue and by presenting theme.

Fiction writing ventures to touch the taboo, the things we were told not to talk about–the disease of the human soul. It allows us to explore the reasons and ways we survive the unthinkable, how and why we thrive and live extraordinary lives despite circumstances hell-bent on destroying us.

Agatha Christie

Writing is cathartic. In writing fiction we share our experiences, transferring our pain and disappointment onto awaiting blank pages. We can do so without being condescending or preachy; we can do so without guilt or shame. We can do it without knowing the answers to all of the questions.

The truth is, writing our stories often invoke more questions than they answer and that’s OK. It is unlike non-fiction—self-help books, biographies and the like. Fiction awakens giants– towering monsters of anger, hurt, jealousy and racism, the like of which, we were content to allow their resting place. There is a connectedness of the human spirit that seeks to know why we do what we do. It is human nature to want to know why we can be such complicated, unpredictable enigmas and at the same time easy and uncomplicated.

 

Zora

If it hurts write it. Confused? Write on. As you allow your mind to reveal its secrets you will find a release; a peace will unfold, but not before you inflict upon yourself intense pain, face terrors of the soul and expose old wounds which healed awkwardly, incompletely.

But then, the healing will come. And although you may not know the answers your questions will all point vertically to a God who has all the answers. He is the creator of the soul. And even then all won’t be revealed to you—at least not in one fell swoop.  But you will begin to see light and understand that sometimes you don’t have to know the answers but only that they exist.

 

Man in the Arena

Man in the Arena

Just a little inspiration for a Tuesday….

 

roosevelt_quote

 

 

Don’t worry about the ones who question your reason for doing what you do. Go at it with all you’ve got.

1muhammad ali

Painting of Muhammad Ali by JaBrion Graham

The world needs to hear what you have to say.

 

SPEAK